Thursday, February 02, 2006

Steal My Body Home

After reading and commenting on "Ignitor's" blog, I thought people may think it's strange that I feel that SLC and "northern Utah" are a world apart. True, I can make the drive in 3.5 hours but I also have 3 kids, age 5 and under. To go to the grocery store is an event in itself. You have to construct this fortress of cart, kids, car seats and coats just to be mobile within the store. You have to hope one of them doesn't go shooting away and need to be hunted. You hope what you put in the cart, stays in the cart and you keep an eye on the contents of the cart to ensure that only authorized material is being purchased. And if ONE member of family has to use the bathroom, it sends ripples through the whole unit requiring "special arrangements" to be made. As a parent, the timer is always ticking or you are trying to manage your kids telepathically, evaluating the sounds outside with the greatest scrutiny. Once I don't have to worry about these things then I will think about making an "experience" of using the bathroom by adding a heated toilet seat.

And those are just the menial daily tasks. If you try to bump things up to a road trip then the furthest thing from your mind should be relaxation. Maybe I can buy myself some leniency on my blog's spelling, grammar and inability to run with a complete thought by pointing out that much if this is accomplished with a 7 month old betweeen myself and the computer. This hobby is another of my selfish indulgences. Like reading a book at 3am. It seems like a sort of identity theft. I'm allowed to be myself only in brief stolen moments when I can sneak away.

This is the lifestyle I'm getting used to for the next 5 years or so. I hope my friends and family understand. This is the reason why it's not tons of fun to hang out: if the kids feel like watching Spongebob for two hours then that's what we'll probably do. I don't like to make them take it upon themselves to make their own fun around my feet as I do what I want.

To jump to the next thought: I also think that we're too young to reminisce about 'the good old days.' We should think the best are still ahead, regardless of the unlikelihood. Here's to a future that isn't here or now.

5 comments:

ShootingStar said...

I agree that looking back (at least for too long) is counter productive to a good life in general. I also have to catch myself if I look to long into the alluring what-will-be. Each day is a gift to be opened, enjoyed and danced around in--good and bad.

PsychoIntern said...

I like that sentence..."I'm allowed to be myself only in brief stolen moments when I can sneak away." I feel like that while parenting all of my kids too...maybe because the way I view myself (my identity) has not fully encompassed being a "dad." I have spent much more of my life not being a dad so I feel that my non-dad identity is my true self. I guess I need to learn to integrate fatherhood into my identity, and then I will feel more like myself when I am with my kids. :) I enjoy the blog...I enjoy your insights...keep blogging away!

Catherine said...

I have four kids, and you just very awesomely described a slice of a multiple-child parent's life. GREAT blog post.

Native Minnow said...

Hey, who said there was anything wrong with sitting around watching Sponge Bob for two hours. I do that sometimes when I'm home alone, let alone when the kids are visiting.

I agree with Ryan, I love the part about only being allowed to be yourself in the moments when you can sneak away. Powerful words.

your mother said...

Hey, I survived you, Em, Joel, and May. There is life after children, but I remember the life we had with you with great fondness. It was the best of times, even though we make more money now and have time to blog with you. Every day IS a gift, especially with your children....